In My Orbit…

10 07 2012

Digital Image courtesy of Danilo Rizzuti / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

As the Beatle’s song says, “I read the news today–Oh, boy!” The usual assortment of the good, the bad, the ugly, and even the downright entertaining!

The Kids Are Not Alright

According to an analysis by the nonprofit, nonpartisan group YoungInvincibles, Youth Joblessness will drone on, and prospects of a future upswing look bleak. The bad news, from Yahoo! News:

“The unemployment rate for 16- to 24-year-olds now stands at 16.5 percent, more than double the rate for the population at large (8.2 percent). For Latino youth, the rate is 20.5 percent, and for African-American youth, 30.2 percent. Fewer than half of all young Americans hold any kind of job at all, says the report.

These numbers, while daunting, fail to take include young people who have given up looking for work and dropped out of the labor force altogether.”

Youth Joblessness: No End in Sight.

All I can say is, welcome to real world, youngins. When you vote for tropes like Hope and Change, you pretty much get neither. My wish is that you choose better this go-round, but I won’t hold my breath.

Colored People

Apparently Governor Mitt Romney plans to speak to the NAACP on Wednesday. I ask myself, Why? But, that’s a blog post for another day.

President Barack Obama cannot break away from his busy fundraising and campaigning schedule to speak to the organization who got out the vote for him in 2008. So who is he sending?… Vice President Joe Biden. That’s a comedy sketch ready to be written.

A bunch of white progressive liberals decided to make the joke on Romney by dubbing him “too white for Blacks to like.” Riddle me this? What do a bunch of entitled media-elite white men know about what is “too white” for Black people? Did they quiz their Black friends? Hire a Black media consultant? Put Dave Chappelle or Chris Rock on retainer? And if they did this, why not give the brotha (or sista) some credit?

And they call conservatives and the Tea Party racist? SMH.

Still shaking my head over the Morgan Freeman NPR interview. According to Morgan, Obama is not our first Black President. I’ve been saying that since he was elected in 2008, so big whoop. However, the fact that the President can’t get ahead with his agenda is not his fault–it’s Republican obstructionism. Can we get some cheese with that whine?

The first two years of his Presidential term he had a full Democratic House and Senate, pushed through the Porkulus package that was supposed to keep unemployment below 8 percent #FAIL!, and got Obamacare Obamatax passed. So can we also color Morgan confused?

I have loved Morgan Freeman on screen since The Electric Company, but like most celebs, when it comes to politics, he is off his nut.

Obla de Obla da Life Goes On…

I would be remiss if I didn’t mention our old friends, the Occupy Movement. There was a National Gathering mounted for 4th of July weekend, appropriately dubbed “The Occupy National Gathering” or #NatGat for the Twitterverse.

Occupy just refuses to go gently into that good night, and apparently the event went over like a lead balloon. The skinny from Breitbart’s Big Government site:

“The turnout was awful. The Guardian said about 500 people showed up for the National Gathering. There’s no real excuse for that since the event has been promoted for months. Philadelphia was actually a great choice for a location and not just for symbolic reasons; it’s an easy train ride from a number of cities that had significant Occupy presences, including New York City, Washington D.C. and Boston. Even bringing a small percentage of the Occupiers in those cities should have culled a far higher number.

If the attendance was pathetic, the fundraising was downright humiliating.  The Occupy National Gathering put up a fundraising page with the modest goal of $15,000. […]

“Total raised for Occupy National Gathering according to their website : $600. Not a typo. Six. Hundred. Dollars.  There are church bake sales in small towns that bring in more ducats than that. “

In Occupy’s defense, there was record heat in the East Coast that weekend. On second thought, when there are good barbecues and fireworks going on, why waste your time on an essentially defunct movement? Missing you already, Occupy, missing you already.

Now we move from the entertaining, to the ridiculous.

Sitting Doing Nothing

The Wall Street Journal is being its usual helpful self by reporting that Sitting for more than 3 hours a day can cut your Life Expectancy. If this were true, I should really be dead by now!

Yet another medical study (published in BMJ Open, an online medical journal) that someone spent millions of dollars to mount. The amount of people who are unemployed and underemployed, and you couldn’t spend the money on something more… productive? And how many hours did these researchers spend sitting to research and write this drivel?

In protest, I decided to find Couch Potato; Weird Al Yankovic’s parody of Eminem’s Lose Yourself. BMJ Open can bite my sometimes sedentary, shapely Yoga ass.

Short People Got No Reason to Live

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, the diminutive crusader (at 5 ft 6 inches) against salt, trans-fat, and now Big Gulp sodas is mounting a contest to stir development of 275- to 300- square-foot micro apartments. [Pause here for uproarious laughter]

“The ministudios will be just big enough for a bathroom, kitchen and sleeping and dining areas — but Bloomberg said tenants shouldn’t plan on doing much entertaining.”

Mayor Bloomberg launches contest to stir development of  tiny 300 square-foot apartment for singles.

So, what’s the point? Or are we trying to create a new generation of clown car?

The article also points out that, “Bloomberg’s 12,500-square-foot upper East Side townhouse is about 40 times as big as the micro units.” Bet he won’t be moving into one of those units, despite being the perfect size for them.

One more reason that I am thankful to live in Los Angeles. Smilin’ Tony may be the 11 percent Mayor of Los Angeles, but I’ll take a do-nothing over a meddler any day.

 

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In My Orbit…

6 06 2012

Digital Image courtesy of Danilo Rizzuti / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

The political junkie in me is totally strung out today–too much news to discuss, so I’m hitting the larger themes.

Winners and Losers

I am not hiding the fact that I am thrilled, thrilled! at the victory of Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker over the Union-backed recall effort to oust him from office. I would feel this way for any leader of principle who merely sought to deliver what he had promised to his constituents upon winning the election, then suffered a temper-tantrum from the Union strongholds, who were merely being asked to sacrifice like the rest of the state, but chose to instead mount a campaign to oust him. Well, the Unions lost spectacularly, and spent a lot of money doing so.

Both sides of the aisle are spinning it for their advantage, and the Left in particular is crying foul, “democracy died“, and blaming outside money and the 7-1 overspending of the Republican and Tea Party machines. I thought the Tea Party was dead?–psyched your mind!

It is interesting that those same liberals and leftists are not decrying the SuperPACs campaigning and collecting money for the Obama 2012 re-election or the deep pockets that President Obama is courting to contribute to his re-election coffers… but I digress.

For this transplanted Midwesterner from the freakishly blue state of Illinois to an even scarier blue state of California (both union strangleholds), this is just a huge coup. Signs of sanity are even evidencing themselves in Cali’s local elections: in a landslide vote, both San Jose and San Diego citizens approved ballot measures to cut pensions for city workers–so you know the dam is breaking. Now if it will only burst forth and wash Los Angeles in its reformist wake. I continue to hold out hope.

But back to Walker: that a leader says what he means, means what he says, and actually follows through with action is a rare thing to behold. But the greater fact that other people of principle rewarded Walker’s consistency, courage and stick-to-itedness by keeping him in office says volumes. And he won by a larger margin than he did in 2010! That’s something you aren’t hearing from the mainstream media outlets. Jonathan S. Tobin said it best: Courage Rewarded. Give it a read.

The Weekly Standard echoes this as well, but places the victory squarely where it belongs:

“Walker turned a $3.6 billion deficit into a $154 million surplus. Unemployment is down. So are property taxes. Businesses, even with uncertainty about the U.S. economy, are optimistic about the direction of the state. Even with the political divisions, it’s hard to imagine a more successful 16 months as governor.

“Results matter. And that, more than anything else, explains why Scott Walker won.”

No matter what pundits have to say, it will have a resounding effect on the November elections and the political process at large. My sweet home Chicago Tribune attests to this in an editorial today:

“On Tuesday, a majority of the voters who for a year and a half have spent the most time weighing those sorts of numbers reaffirmed that they think their Wisconsin governments had grown too elephantine, too expensive.

“There’s another elephant in the room: Act 10 ended the compulsory collection of union dues by government employers. It turns out that when workers have a free choice of whether to keep paying, many decide that it isn’t worth the money. We were surprised last week by a Wall Street Journal report that Wisconsin membership in the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees plummeted from 62,818 in March 2011 to 28,745 in February 2012. At the American Federation of Teachers, 6,000 of 17,000 Wisconsin members have walked away.

“Drop-offs that stark have implications not only for the unions, but also for politicians who rely on union donations to fund their campaigns.” (emphasis mine)

Unions will be less of a piggy bank for political causes, because the very workers who fund their efforts will now have more of a voice on how their dues are used; and in some cases, will be able to choose to not retain union membership. That’s a big deal.

He’s Baaack!

Because certain Angeleans continue to be useful idiots, the city will once again be subjected to a near traffic shutdown with yet another fundraising visit from our President. I continue to be thankful that I no longer work anywhere near the West side. Let the NIMBYs in Bev Hills and Brentwood have what they deserve!

I just love these Hitler videos. Speaks to both of my musings quite nicely.

 





In My Orbit…

9 05 2012

Digital Image courtesy of Danilo Rizzuti / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

So The Girl has been vacating and marinating under the Central Coast skies, joining hubby in his geek pursuit of Military Radio collection, and visiting with his family. All-in-all, a nice little respite, where I got more sleep than I have in several months now–so it’s all good.

Time Passages

Now it’s back to life’s realities, and one of those is dealing with death. A few weeks back for In My Orbit, I paid tribute to Jack Gilbert and my cousin Ricky. Jack Gilbert’s memorial service is this Saturday, and it will be fitting to be part of a more public tribute to such a good man.

When you get to my age, you start marking time by these passages, and two more have made me reflective: Maurice Sendak, and Digby Wolfe.

Maurice Sendak, author and illustrator of Where The Wild Things Are, In The Night Kitchen, and Outside Over There, died yesterday at the age of 83.  I loved Sendak’s work–it spoke to me as an introspective, bookish child, and the illustrations inspired me as a young artist. My first college major was commercial art with an emphasis in illustration; but I found I was much better at painting with words.

His books, along with Florence Parry Heide and Edward Gorey’s The Shrinking of Treehorn, and Julian Scheer’s Rain Makes Applesauce were part of the formative alchemy of who The Girl is today. Had I had children, I would have read his books to them too, passing on these shaping works to another generation.

I had the privilege of taking a class with Digby Wolfe in his last year of teaching at the University of Southern California, and went on to do one semester of focused study under his tutelage.

Digby Wolfe was one of the creators of Laugh-In, and his wit was just as sharp and fun 30-years in, as it was when he wrote the show in the 60s. He also had a depth of insight about character, and writer motivations which helped to make me more conscious and more directed in my own writing. Digby died of lung cancer on May 2, at the age of 82.

It was interesting that as a successful Renaissance man (he was an actor and singer as well) he spent the balance of his life as an academic, albeit a non-traditional one. He taught in the Watts Writer’s Workshop, then at USC, before he left Los Angeles for the University of New Mexico at Albuquerque.  The obit in the Los Angeles Times said it best:

“‘He wasn’t an academic in any traditional sense,” Jim Linnell, dean of fine arts, said with a laugh. “He was a provocateur and a satirist. Having Digby in an academic program kept things lively, challenging and constantly pushing the boundaries of getting work done.'”

As a writer, I was blessed to have that support and influence, even for a brief time.

Chain of Fools

So I was fortunate to miss the Occupy LA/Immigrant Rights protest on May Day. While this local counterpart managed to remain low-key (what a shock), their brother organizations in Seattle and Cleveland did not fare so well. Downtown Seattle saw millions of dollars in commercial and personal property damage, and 25 arrests. But Cleveland takes the cake.

Five OWS Cleveland protestors plotted, then attempted, to blow up the Brecksville-Northfield High Level Bridge, 15-miles outside of downtown Cleveland. The smooth criminals rigged explosives that they thought were packed with C-4 at the base of the bridge, and tried to detonate them using a text-message code.

Of course, when you announce such an intention to a G-Man, you are bound to fail. Apparently an undercover FBI agent had infiltrated their pack and managed to thwart the plot by supplying phony explosives, and then calling in the posse. Good times!

OWS Cleveland’s official word is that they do recall these guys at their events, but they do not support bombing bridges. One of the suspects actually signed the lease to property where the OWS Cleveland protestors camp; so I think guilt by association can be proven here. What surprises me is the light press this continues to receive.

Now, had this been a right-wing group, or people who claimed to be a part of the Tea Party? It would be the Trayvon Martin news cycle all over again.

Rich Lowry calls it like he sees it, in an opinion piece in the New York Post; give it a read, if only to get the other viewpoint on these protests and the type of people it attracts.

Clowns to the Left of Me

From my house, that’s the direction toward Downtown L.A., where our idiot City Council wages war against sanity, commerce, and anyone finding or keeping a job in Los Angeles.

Their latest campaign involves banning single use plastic bags in an attempt to supposedly reduce litter. The law of unintended consequences comes into play here. According to the Los Angeles Times, Crown Poly, one major manufacturer of plastic bags, estimates they may have to lay off 20 to 130 employees because of this action. With unemployment numbers in Los Angeles city in the 10-11 percent range, you would think they would take pause at this action. But “think” and “Los Angeles City Council” are often mutually exclusive.

One of the useful idiots, Councilman Paul Koretz, compared the company to makers of horse-drawn carriages who were phased out with the introduction of the automobile.

“‘I’m the last one to allow for layoffs in L.A. city, and I fight them hard,’ he said. ‘But I’ve never stood and said that if a job doesn’t make sense anymore, that we’ve got to keep that job.'”

Who says it doesn’t make sense? The majority of these bags are made from recycled material–heck, some of the grocery stores have recycle kiosks for unused bags, along with other things recyclable.  How many people are employed in this enterprise? I know a few, and their jobs are on the chopping block too.

I’m all for environmental awareness, but like what they did in the San Joaquin Valley to save a Delta smelt, this smacks of foolishness that will further cripple the city and the State.





The Turning of the Tide

2 08 2011

Water Surge by Michael Drummond/Public Domain Pictures.net

It is indeed that, as I turn 45 today. I’m still trying to wrap my head around how I went from a teenager who didn’t think she’d live past high school, to middle life. I have never needed drugs to go on mental trips–they simply come to me from everyday life.

My sea-change of life somewhat parallels the sea-change in the Christian world, and I’ve written about it on my Examiner.com page. Give it a read! It’s my birthday, after all.

And it looks like Congress, the Senate and the White House decided to give me a birthday present of “resolving”? the debt-ceiling debacle before the deadline, ensuring the United States does not go into default. Yeah… Uh Huh.

My favorite quote of the post-mortem on this deal comes from Jim Geraghty on the Hugh Hewitt Show yesterday. Jim expressed his own lukewarm feelings on the resolution, and said something to the effect that every time it looks as though we have government spending locked up and under control, they pull a Harry Houdini on us. Well said.

I have the feeling that this so-called Super Committee will have as much affect as the Debt Commission. Lots of time and money spent on coming to conclusions and solutions, which ultimately end up in the political round file.

But for now, neither side is giving high-fives or breaking out the champagne. Quin Hilyer’s piece in The American Spectator pretty much sums it up: “The Deal Sort of Stinks… But Only ‘Sort of’“. Erick Ericson, never a glass-half-full fellow to begin with, headlined his RedState Morning Briefing with “We All Lose.” Tell us how you really feel, Erick.

The far Left is particularly in a tizzy.  The favorite quote on their side comes from Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, who called the deal, “A sugar-coated Satan sandwich.” Cleaver’s a poet, and he didn’t even know it!

Kevin Drum of Mother Jones trips over a familiar leftist canard: People are too stupid to realize just how important government is in their lives, and we just have to be more persuasive, dammit! It’s Public Opinion, Stupid. He blames the progressives for not turning the tide of public opinion to support liberal agendas:

“We just haven’t persuaded the public to support our vision of government. Until we do, the tea party tendency will always be more powerful than we are.”

Oh, please. We have seen your vision of government and we don’t want it. And every attempt to ram it down our throats simply causes us to stiffen our backs even more. This is why the pendulum is swinging in the Tea Party direction. Get over yourself, Kevin.

But ultimately, it’s Nick Gillespie, Reason Magazine blogger, who hits it out the park: “The Debt-Ceiling Debate is Dead! Long Live the Debt! Or, Will ObamaCare Cover What Krugman’s Smoking?”

Spectacular headline aside, he pretty much echoes my feelings on this entire debacle:

“In fact, the real reason to be bothered by the whimper with which the debt-ceiling squabble seems to be ending is this: It doesn’t address the real issue, which is the debt load of the country.”

Or as I would say it, kicking the can to the next generation. I have no children of my own, but I feel sorry for my nephews and nieces; they will ultimately pay for all this malfeasance.

Happy Birthday, to me!





In My Orbit…

8 03 2011

Digital Image courtesy of Danilo Rizzuti / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

So despite an interim agreement that will carry us through March, the country could still face a Government shutdown if Congress and the White House cannot come to a budget compromise.

I am no economist, but I fail to see why it is so difficult. For starters, pulling funding from National Public Radio (NPR) and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) would save us billions. These are both progressive darlings, and I have always wondered why they needed the funding to begin with. They could earn more from their supporters in Manhattan and Beverly Hills than anything the government gives them. I say let’s give them that chance. If I made lots of money, I’d support the causes I believe in and ensure they are kept alive. So why can’t they siphon money from those who believe in what they do? One of the reasons I stopped watching public broadcasting was their incessant pledge drives–where does all that money go?

NPR head Vivian Shiller was on Capitol Hill Monday, defending her firing of Juan Williams and why NPR should continue to receive government funding. A quote from her testimony:

“‘We take [federal defunding] very, very seriously,’ she said. ‘It would have a profound impact we believe on our ability – of public broadcasting’s ability – to deliver news and information.'”

I have listened to NPR from time to time, but don’t consider myself a fan. It has some interesting bits, but most of it is pretend high-brow intellectualism with a fully political agenda. Don’t get me wrong: I’m fine with political agendas, just don’t pretend or claim that you are above it. NPR is fully a pretender.

So isn’t it convenient that fresh off Ms. Shiller’s turn before the Congressional committee, James O’Keefe rolls out another sting video, this time involving former NPR executive Ron Schiller (different spelling and no relation to the current head) and Betsy Liley, NPR’s director of institutional giving.

The video pretty much shows that NPR does indeed have an agenda, and despises the unwashed masses of conservatives who do not side with it. While much of the rightosphere saw the smoking gun in the fact that Schiller all but admitted that they don’t need the government funding, and his calling the Tea Party racist (that’s original), what I found most egregious was his waxing eloquent about the lack of education, and a campaign of “anti-intellectualism” that supposedly infests the nation. One quote from the video has him saying that what he is:

“most disappointed by in this country, which is that the educated, so-called elite in this country is too small a percentage of the population, so that you have this very large un-educated part of the population that carries these ideas.”

I have two degrees: a Bachelors and a Masters, both from prestigious institutions. People who never ask me about my politics assume by virtue of those degrees, my conversational prowess, and that I am a black woman who wears dreadlocks that I must be a part of this “educated, so-called elite”.  So like Schiller in the video, they feel at liberty to say the most ugly, demeaning, and dare I say, anti-Semitic things about those who do not hold their views. I have had comments said to me that would make even my weighty dreds stand on end!

In my pursuit of education, I have managed to avoid the delusion that people who do not pursue higher education are stupid and uneducated. I also don’t assume that just because certain people choose to live in other parts of the country and listen to Fox News or Rush Limbaugh, that they are automatically racist and xenophobic.

But what I most strongly reject is the belief that intelligence and education will solve all the worlds ills, and it has always befuddled me why a good majority of the professors and students I encountered in my own journey see these as a cure-all.

It definitely solves some, otherwise I would not have bothered to get two degrees. But if education and intellect were truly the solution, do you think I would be unemployed for over two years and scraping to earn a living? My degrees and intellect should solve that problem for me, shouldn’t it? People should want someone as erudite and accomplished as myself on their payroll, don’t you think? And not just me, but the many members of the Tuesdays with Transitioners group that I lead, who are equally- if not more- intelligent and accomplished, yet are having difficulty landing full-time work.

And how about what’s going on with the Middle East? Our highly educated and very intellectual President is dithering and ineffective by many liberal and conservative accounts, issuing half-hearted warnings with not a clue on how to resolve the issue.  Shouldn’t his degrees from Columbia, Harvard Law, and that Nobel Peace Prize be a guarantee that he knows exactly what to do and how best to bring about a resolve to the situations in Egypt, Libya and Palestine?

And finally, if Mr. Schiller is so damn smart, then how did he get caught on camera with his pants down?

Video below for those who are interested.

 





In My Orbit…

20 01 2011

Digital Image courtesy of Danilo Rizzuti / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Mother Jones writer David Corn summarily dismisses the Republican effort to repeal Obamacare as “throwing one big bag to their tea party backers” in GOP Health Care Plan: More Repeal, than Replace.  Like many of the Left, he sees it as political theater, without must substance.

Also from MoJo, Suzy Khimm claims to give Health Care Reform by the Numbers, pointing out the benefits of the currently enacted provisions (the rest don’t kick in until 2014) and what a great loss it would be to the nation if the law is repealed.

Of course, Khimm fails to point out the other unintended consequences that will actually cost us (personally and financially) more than the law will supposedly save.  Remember all those waivers given to small businesses and unions exempting them from the regulatory burden of the law? Government by Waiver: The Breakdown of Public Administration.  Rep. Mike Rogers (R-MI) reinforces the contradictions of this administrative debacle:  Need a waiver from Obamacare? Get in line.

How about the doctors who still decry this law, have never gotten on board with its passage, and see it as the beginning of the death throes to their profession? Survey: US Doctors Fear Healthcare Reform.

A pull quote from the survey:

“Nearly two-thirds of U.S. doctors surveyed fear healthcare reform could worsen care for patients, by flooding their offices and hurting income, according to a Thomson Reuters survey released Tuesday.”

Sally Pipes in the New York Post (The Damage has Already Begun) concurs with the doctors and the Republican House:

“A Physician’s Foundation survey revealed that 40 percent of doctors plan to ‘drop out of patient care in the next one to three years.’ Sixty percent said ObamaCare will ‘compel them to close or significantly restrict their practices to certain categories of patients” — typically those on Medicare or Medicaid.'”

What I like about this article is that she doesn’t just lay out theoretical calculations, but gives the real-time human impact of the policies taking effect this year, from construction being stopped on 45 physician-owned hospitals because of certain provisions in the law  (gives new meaning to the term, “job-killing”), to restricting being able to obtain over-the-counter medications (like Claritan) through a Health Savings Account.  I have personally benefited from an HSA plan, and used it to buy most of my OTC medicines through it; so the fact that insureds will not be allowed to save money this way seems short-sighted, if not calculated.

Then there are the now 26 states (half the country) that have filed a lawsuit against Obamacare, charging it is unconstitutional and violates people’s rights: 26 States join Obama health care lawsuit in Fla.  The so-called “Individual Mandate” is really the linchpin of Obamacare.  If you can’t legally enforce the purchase of your (and your neighbor’s) health insurance, then where will the funding come from?

The debate rages on, as the House voted 245 to 189 to repeal the bill. National Review Online discusses why this is not mere theater or posturing:

“Passage by the House of full repeal makes it abundantly clear that Obamacare is far from a settled matter. That’s a crucial message to send to the public, to employers, to the states, and to participants in the health sector, as they make decisions about what is likely to happen with Obamacare in coming years.”

The Wall Street Journal also chimes in, arguing that “symbolic” does not equal meaningless:

“The stunning political reality is that a new entitlement that was supposed to be a landmark of liberal governance has been repudiated by a majority of one chamber of Congress only 10 months after it passed. This sort of thing never happens.”

Expect to see more sweeping commentary about people dying because they are uninsured, and theoretical case-studies about the dire consequences of repeal, along with more light being shed on what the actual tenets of law will produce.  After the shady back room deals and arm twisting that ushered in Obamacare’s passage, I look forward to the exposure.





In My Orbit…

16 09 2010

Digital Image courtesy of Danilo Rizzuti / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

This is the “Girl’s Gone Wild” edition of In My Orbit.  The way the GOP establishment and the mainstream media is treating the Delaware Republican candidate for Senate is akin to how they would treat some bubble-headed-young-adult girl who flashes her breasts in the aforementioned DVD series.  So much tsk, tsking, Karl Rove bemoaning that all is lost, and the usual credibility-destroying stories about financial and mortgage troubles, abstinence work, and a masturbation comment?  A good chunk of the country (including yours truly) are unemployed, underemployed, or have lost their homes to foreclosure; so as far as we’re concerned, she can actually identify with what real people go through. We have an admitted tax cheat as Secretary of the Treasury–financial malfeasance didn’t stop the Senate from confirming him, did it?  And with sexually transmitted diseases and teen pregnancy on the rise, abstinence education doesn’t look all that bad.  Truly, if this is the best they can come up with, then Christine O’Donnell is definitely a shoe-in for November.

The smart and sassy political consultant and radio co-host Jeri Thompson, who also happens to be the wife of former Senator, Presidential candidate, and Law and Order DA Fred Thompson, chisels a substantive piece in her American Spectator column today.  Jeri exposes and excoriates those behind the Christine O’Donnell silliness, detailing the establishment’s marginalization of women conservatives, the Tea Party movement, and the new wave of populism that has been ushered in because of said Party, and despite the GOP establishment.  A prescient quote:

“While they may not be intending to be sexist, the message, the attitude and whining sure make many in the GOP look eerily like the elites we are trying so hard to usurp. The sexism issues aside, it’s time for the Washington GOP establishment to man up and stop sulking over losing — no, getting walloped — by a woman they continue to insist is unqualified despite the fact that she has a pretty big win under her belt under pretty difficult circumstances.”

My good read of the day:  Don’t Tell Me She Cant Win.

And the Daily Mail drops an interesting tidbit about our dear FLOTUS.  In a new biography by journalists Michael Darmon and Yves Derai in collaboration with Carla Bruni, the FLOF (First Lady of France), Ms. Bruni allegedly asked Michelle Obama about her position as the U.S. President’s wife, and Mrs. Obama replied: “Don’t ask! It’s hell. I can’t stand it!”

There have been denials by both Ms. Bruni’s and Mrs. Obama’s handlers that these words were never spoken, and I believe that’s true.  Who wouldn’t love taxpayer-funded vacations to Spain and magazine photo ops practically ever week?

Whether true or not, like the “first time in my adult life I’m proud of my country” comment, this one will be wrapped around her neck like an albatross.  Michele Obama thinks being First Lady is ‘hell’…

And sweet Gabourey “Gabby” Sidibe of Precious fame graces the cover of Elle magazine this October!  This is unprecedented, since no woman above a single-digit size has ever been allowed to headline the magazine.  A milestone or an anomaly, who knows?  But such an accomplishment should be celebrated, particularly after obvious snubs of the young and vivacious Gabby by Vanity Fair and Vogue in their Hollywood editions.  Sadly enough, the majority of the news coverage is about whether Elle “lightened” her skin in the photos! Gabourey Sidibe’s Elle Magazine Cover Raises Controversy…

It once again highlights Hollywood’s discomfort with plus-sized role models, particularly women of color, who on the average, can more closely identify with Gabby Sidibe than say, Halle Berry.  Despite their gifts and accomplishments that have little to do with their size, the Hollywood starmaker machine finds ways to diss them and get them to lose weight, then hawk their new size five as spokesmodels for Weight Watchers and Jenny Craig.  Jennifer Hudson is the latest example of this model.

With a new supporting role in the Showtime series The Big C, maybe Gabby will stay strong–one can hold out hope.








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