Black History Month 2015: Condoleezza Rice

10 02 2015

“Race is a constant factor in American life. Yet reacting to every incident, real or imagined, is crippling, tiring, and ultimately counterproductive.” Condoleezza Rice

Condoleezza Rice grew up in the Jim Crow South, so she knows of what she speaks when she talks about reacting to every incident of racism and marginalization. As the first female African-American National Security Adviser, and the first African-American female Secretary of State, she was constantly criticized by her own people because she chose to be a Republican and part of the administration of an unpopular president, and also because she refuses to play the victim.

The so-called civil rights protesters and #BlackLivesMatter activists could stand to take a page from her book. In my article, #BlackLivesMatter–a hashtag bandaid over the gaping wounds of Black problems, I posit:

“Protesting is an American right, whether over social media or done in an orderly fashion as is happening now in the cities of New York, Boston and Chicago over the Garner decision. Here is the problem: it is not Blacks being targeted by a white, militaristic police system or a justice system that is fatally flawed. It is Blacks’ devaluation of their own lives and the refusal to deal with systemic issues in urban communities.

“Had #BlackLivesMatter remained a consistent mantra over the last 50 years, we would not have the fatherlessness, crime, and poverty that perpetuate the vicious cycle of violence, excessive policing, and loss of life.

“Enough Black leaders have pointed to poverty, lack of fathers, and the street culture as causations. So why do we keep harping on race and an “other”, rather than truly addressing what we have pinpointed is the true problem?”

Read more here at Communities Digital News.

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Black History Month 2015: Zora Neale Hurston

5 02 2015

zora-neale-hurston

“It would be against all nature for all the Negroes to be either
at the bottom, top, or in between. We will go where the internal drive carries us like everybody else. It is up to the individual.”

Zora Neale Hurston

Zora is one of my favorite writers. Her language is beautiful, uplifting, elegant, and scarcely seen in modern literature. Literacy across the board is becoming a thing of the distant past, much to the detriment of of our people.

I explore this a bit more over at Communities Digital News, Black History Month 2015: Let’s promote a return to literacy:

“Sadly, the richness of literacy exhibited by her and her contemporaries—like Langston Hughes, who would have been 113 this week—is sorely lacking in today’s literature. Do our young people even know the names of these and other great writers, or the titles of their works? If the crisis in our culture is any indication, we are failing our children by starving them of the substantive words and sweeping vision of great writers while spoon-feeding them the steady pabulum of gangster rap and reality television.”

Read more here.





Black History Month 2015: Harriet Tubman

2 02 2015

harriet-tubman

“I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand
more if only they knew they were slaves
.
-Harriet Tubman

This famous quote by the “Black Moses” could well be applied today. The chains of slavery are evident in the mind, attitudes and allegiances of our race, and are being reflected in the lack of leadership and focus in the modern civil rights movement:

“Seeing the power, presence, and passion of Dr. King artfully portrayed by actor David Oyelowo, as well as the re-enactment of the give and take between Ralph Abernathy and Andrew Young of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, and John Lewis of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, merely spotlights the total lack of conviction or moral authority in the civil rights movement of today. In place of an intelligent, articulate, and anointed Dr. King, we have the mush-mouthed Al Sharpton, and the empty bumper sticker slogans of “No Justice, No Peace,” and “Black Lives Matter.”

Dr. King is flipping in his grave.”

Read the rest at my Communities Digital News column: Martin Luther King Day, Selma, and the moral scarcity in modern-day civil rights.





Black Heritage Month: Week 1–Can’t we all just get along?

3 02 2012

Tom Nab/Photobucket.com

Lloyd Marcus, Black American, spokesperson for the Tea Party, and the author of the “Tea Party Anthem”, recently penned Another Black History Month: The Left’s Favorite Time of the Year.

Marcus clearly makes the point that Black “progress” is filtered through a liberal mindset:

“Rather than presenting a balanced, honest look at black history, leftist schoolteachers and the media say America is still racist and whites should feel eternally guilty.  Also included in the left’s message is that blacks must continue to vote monolithically for Democrats in order to keep rich white Republican racists at bay.  Yes, for the most part, Black History Month is a propaganda tool of the Democratic party.”

I could not have said it better myself. Most of the documentaries I have watched have either had the undercurrent of “pity poor us” or “we haven’t come far at all”. And rarely do I see positive representations of the strides and contributions of conservative Blacks.

Take for instance, former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice–one of the smartest women in the world with a fascinating life and background. It doesn’t matter what her political affiliation is or that she was part of an administration that some people view in a less than positive light; as one of our Black trailblazers, she should get recognition for her accomplishments and how she has paved the way for others. But for the most part, all she has gotten is mockery and ridicule from liberal Blacks and whites alike.

And speaking of mockery and ridicule, I also read this article about a Black Memphis DJ who was allowed to verbally abuse, berate, and belittle a Black female Republican politician. Charlotte Bergmann is running for a congressional seat in Memphis, and as far as I can see, she acted with decorum and patience, while DJ Thaddeus Matthews simply beclowned himself.

Liberals are having fits over Arizona Governor Jan Brewer‘s supposed disrespect of President Obama a few weeks ago, yet I haven’t heard any outrage about this. The host was allowed to show blatant disrespect to a female and fellow person of his color, yet I doubt if he suffers any backlash, because he’s supposedly “down” with the struggle.

See for yourself. WARNING: Foul and unnecessary language.

Is this what the Freedom and Liberty that was bought and paid for by the Blood, sweat and toil of Blacks and whites is being used for? To point fingers, and call each other Toms and House Niggas? Our true Black leaders, from Harriet Tubman, to Frederick Douglass, to Dr. Martin Luther King are rolling in their graves. This is NOT what they risked their lives for, and if they could speak today, they would tell it like it is.

I have said in the past, and will continue to say this: Can we just teach American history in all its hues, and get rid of this “token” time of the year to supposedly honor Black progress–especially when that “progress” is left to the interpretation of a select few? Can we stop fighting battles that have already been won, and focus on battles that are still raging, and where people are actually dying?

We are a people who have forgotten who we are, where we came from, and the price others have paid so that we can wallow in our racial and political tunnel vision.

We cannot see the forest for the trees.








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