In My Orbit…

20 12 2010

Digital Image courtesy of Danilo Rizzuti / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

So the Girl has been busy–not only with Holiday cheer and parties, but with interview subjects for Examiner.com, and networking opportunities for future stories.  The hope is that all this will lead to more paying writing work, so the Year 2011 will be much prosperous–this is my grownup Christmas list!

If you’re still in the market for a live tree and you live in Los Angeles, may I recommend The First Christian Church of North Hollywood‘s Christmas Tree Lot?  They give all their proceeds to children’s charities and they are friendly and reasonable. Check out Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree on my Examiner.com profile, then consider stopping by; their open through December 22.

For you iPad owners and wannabes-: One of the must-have gifts is an interactive book called When Santa Got Sick.  Food4Thought Productions first launch application is a winner and a wonderful marriage between traditional storytelling and new technology.    Click on the title link for a full review of the app–and it’s cheap too!

And the Girl snagged a guest spot on The Oracle Speaks radio program this weekend! It was a wonderful first-time experience, with Denise L. Cook (The Oracle) and her co-host.  I had most of the hour, and got a chance to talk about my writing, reinvention and Play!  How cool is that?  Give it a listen and let me know what you think…

The ORACLE Speaks…PLAY with special guest Jennifer Oliver O’Connell.

 

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In My Orbit…

9 03 2010

Digital Image courtesy of Danilo Rizzuti / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Jones-ing again.  Catching up on the political grapevine, and the fruit is ripe indeed!

Stanley Fish says it plainly, in THE New York Times no less, and I agree–Do You Miss Him Yet? Oh, indeed. It started for me on November 5, 2008, and I am sure it will only get stronger.  Signs continue that the Kool-Aid high that elected our current President has indeed worn off; especially as he continues to lie, spin, and misspeak.  Yep, me and other Americans are right there with you, Stanley!

Mark Steyn cuts with precision, and dissects the true nature of this Obamacare push: Obamacare worth the price to Democrats.  Can’t add anything to Steyn’s brilliance–read the article.

And Karl Rove,  another person that the crazies on both sides love to demonize, starts his book launch today: Courage and Consequences: My Life as a Conservative in the Fight.  I am always fascinated by personalities that everyone loves to hate, whether it’s the left or the right.  I read Hilary Clinton’s book for that reason, though I can’t recommend it.  It’s a snoozer and way too much fiction–but it at least gave her a chance to have her say, and I was interested in hearing it from her perspective.  I’m sure the critics will be brutal simply because he’s Karl Rove; but I pay little attention to critics.  Courage and Consequences will be added to my reading list, along with Going Rogue.  Say what you will about Rove’s politics, he’s a smart man and a class act.





Angel Fall: The Update

16 02 2010

"Angel Fall" cover art by Jeff Gifford

I reviewed Angel Fall and interviewed Coleman Luck for my Examiner page last year.  Apparently things have taken a bizarre turn with the book; read about it on Coleman’s blog: If you own a copy of Angel Fall you own the Collector’s Edition.

I suggest you visit the Girl Recommends… to buy that Collector’s edition while you can!  You can also order directly from Coleman’s site.  Coleman Luck-Angel Fall.





For Fantasy Book Lovers, and others…

24 09 2009

Angel Fall Book CoverColeman Luck advances the tradition of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Madeleine L’Engle in writing a fantasy novel that speaks to modern-day reality and values.  Angel Fall takes the reader on a journey with its three main characters, Alex, Amanda, and Tori Lancaster.

Sixteen-year-old Alex covers his deep pain of rejection and loneliness under a veil of cynicism and seemed world-weary wisdom.

Thirteen-year-old Amanda cowers from the world, buried under the weight of her own fears, and the fears others have placed upon her.

Nine-year-old Tori adopts the role of the perfect child in order to not stir up more pain in her imperfect world.

On a flight to Europe to live with their estranged father, the children’s plane is caught up in an unearthly wind and crashes into the Atlantic Ocean.  From there, they enter another-worldly realm of ancient cities, mysterious creatures called Worwil, and a distinct mission—to carry an innocent baby back to the Great Mountain.  On their journey they encounter catastrophe and depravity from without and within, and are caught in a calamitous battle to save Alex’s soul, and the life of the baby.

Each child’s inner thoughts, fears, and pain is laid bare, and they are faced with choices that teach them the nature of a world that sacrifices its children on the altar of convenience, and discover the result of these sacrifices: twisted truth, and destruction of life and innocence.  In their desire to release their pain and find peace and freedom, each character must make the choice of life or death for themselves, and the other inhabitants of the world.

Luck’s ear for the language and attitude of this generation is quite exceptional, and he alternates from the voice and thought patterns of teen, to tween to child with great precision.  Many modern writers make children and teens sound older and wiser than they really are, creating unrealistic and unrelatable characters.  From page one, Alex, Amanda, and Tori are believable and touchable, and the reader is fully engaged in their subsequent pain and struggles .

Luck uses visual and illustrative language, painting an illuminative portrait of the Earthly world, the Internal world, and the Otherworld.  Sandalban, Bellwind, Lammortan, Melania, Rindzac, and Mirick–the Worwil that interact with the youngsters on their journey, are equally distinctive, engaging, frightening and awe-inspiring in their presence and essence.

Luck also weaves the tension of escalating darkness, starting out in typical teen-story fashion of young people left to themselves and poised for light-hearted trouble.  Then the shadows deepen and the darkness intensifies with each character’s struggle with their decisions and deceptions.   The author makes no bones that evil exists and gains power through our apathy, arrogance, and appetites.  Yet, even with the darkness of the situation, he manages to insert humor in playful, cynical, and sometimes snarky ways.

Luck’s use of cliffhangers is craftily done, and you are carried along with the force of each child’s situation. He conjures a braided parity between illusion and reality: starting out subtlely, then cycling more rapidly with each chapter, until you, the reader, are unaware of which is which.  The book reflects an evil that is insidious, comforting and even innocent in appearance, but which ultimately leads to great pain and dire consequences.

Because of Luck’s stark portrayal of darkness and violent situations, I would not recommend this book for children younger than eleven.   But for tweens, teens and adults, the book offers a riveting tale that upholds life and redemption, with an emphasis on the high cost of both.  Angel Fall is an essential addition to any reading list.

Published by Zondervan.

Available in paperback from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Borders.








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